Posts Tagged ‘Goodluck Jonathan’

nigerian-map.jpg

by Okoye Chukwudi Ezeamalukwuo

This useless man everywhere, this useless man again –that must had been her thought as she ripped another poster off the wall, -that or something more sinister, something more derogatory. Who could read the thoughts in her mind, or exorcise the demon that assailed her that morning. I found her action to be somewhat intriguing, somewhat amusing though I did not know what her story was, or the reason why she was standing by the side of the main road, ripping off only the campaign posters of Mr President from the wall.

Perhaps it was the heat. The temperature that morning was over thirty-five degrees centigrade, and was enough to drive anyone off the edge. Perhaps it wasn’t something physical or something that could be easily quantified. It should take more than an increase in temperature for a person to engage in such act of public spectacle -I thought to myself as I sat on a wooden chair of a decrepit bus at Ikeja bus-stop, staring at her. She neither stopped to acknowledge the increasing crowd of onlookers that had gathered around her, watching her work, nor did she pause to wipe off the rivers of sweat that ran across her face and met at her jaw. The posters was all she cared about and she was determined to rip them all off.

Indeed it must be something serious, something much deeper, something indelible like a crack on a mirror or the breaking of a camel’s back that had endured fifty-four rigorous years of marsh and misrule.

Perhaps she was a mother of one of the Chibok girls. Perhaps she had lost someone dear to her in Baga, or in Mubi, or in Gwoza, or to the rising wave of insecurity that had engulfed the nation in recent times. She looked exasperated like someone tormented by an unseen demon. They say: a hungry man is an angry man –perhaps it was just plain hunger, or poverty or the burden of two months unpaid salaries which had been attributed to fall in global oil prices.

The face of Mr President on those posters was wearing a smile that was somehow queer, somehow mischievous, like he was smiling only at her, taunting her, daring her to rage, daring her to rip him off, to vote him out if she can. It must have been so frustrating for her.

A part of me felt sorry for her as she stood there all alone in the sun like a lone soldier staring straight at the nozzles of a thousand enemy rifles. I felt like calling out to her from where I was sitting in the bus. I felt like walking up to her, to ask if all was well, to tell her that it was going to get better, but I didn’t, I couldn’t. The look in her eyes was enough to stop anyone from coming close to her. It was filled with pain and bitterness. It was clear to me that she was ready to fight anyone who tried to stop her. In fact she would have killed Mr President if he was there in person, but since he wasn’t there, she was contented to destroy all his posters, as if doing so would hurt him physically in some unexplainable way.

Nigeria is really a crazy place and it does get to people sometimes, and make them do crazy things. I have seen a well dressed man in suit and tie; fight a bus conductor over ten naira change. I have seen federal legislators jump gate on national television amidst fanfare and solidarity songs. I have seen policemen change their uniforms into civilian clothes in the face of armed robbery attack. Ours is a crazy country, and the people living in it are crazier. It can only take a full-fledged Nigerian to appreciate the force acting on that woman -a wife, a mother, at that very moment.

Sometimes I wish that solutions to Nigerian problems can be as easy as ripping a poster off the wall, so that I can go about tearing down the posters of corruption, tribalism, nepotism and religious intolerance from our land. Alas! This is far from the case. In fact, in our society, the act of ripping campaign posters from walls can constitute both liberal and criminal offences.

I do not condone her action. I think it was crude and barbaric, and to be carried out in such a public manner without fear or shame, set a negative precinct that might have disastrous consequences for us all. Ours is a young democracy, which has witnessed many rapids and cataracts in its 16 years of existence. We do not need this kind of occurrence especially at this time when the nation is tinkering on a knife edge. It is worrying to read on paper about the shooting of APC supporters during a rally in Port-Harcourt, or the burning of PDP campaign buses in Jos. What is more worrying is the huge number of educated Nigerians on both sides of the divide, who cheer at this kind of news, urging the perpetrators to carry on.
Indeed I do not support her action at all, even though I can relate with whatever it was that she was passing through.

Still she continued her work, ripping the posters with one hand and squeezing it with the other hand. The crowds continued to swell. There were nods of approval from some sections, and in other sections there were angry murmurs of discontent. Someone raised a voice to applaud her, another shouted angrily at her to stop. There was a suggestion that she should be forcefully stopped, someone even said that she deserved a beating. The atmosphere was already charged with accusations and counter-accusations, suspense and suspicion. Just then the driver of the bus I was in, started the engine and drove the bus away taking me with him.

Several days have passed since that day but I can’t get the incident off my mind. Right now as I sit at my writing desk, staring at the map of Nigeria on the wall, I still hear clearly the shouting of that day. I still feel the heat, see clearly the woman rip the posters off the wall, and somewhere in my mind, hope for this country is gradually being ripped off as well.

Ezeamalukwuo writes from Lagos, Nigeria. You can reach him on Twitter via @Mr_Charlze

Liberty of Creativity

President Goodluck Jonathan (left), Gen. Muhammadu Buhari rtd (right)

President Goodluck Jonathan (left), Gen. Muhammadu Buhari rtd (right)

by Okoye Chukwudi Ezeamalukwuo

Now that the issue of who the major contenders for the 2015 Presidential election has finally been resolved, the i-s are gradually being dotted and the t-s being crossed, the debate rages of who is better and who is worse, and the mostly unhealthy rivalry goes on, the momentum keeps building up, and insults continue to be hurl on both candidates by opposite fans, the stage is finally set for what might actually be the last nail on the coffin of an ever-disintegrating Nation.

Nothing has sharply polarised this Nation since the dark days of the counter-coup of 1966 as a Buhari-Jonathan rivalry. A fight between the core muslim North, together with a large section of South-Western Nigeria on one side, and the Christian South-East and their South-South partner on the other side. Judging from online media news; the rhetorics and militant speeches spoken by supporters of both men, one is left with this unnerving premonition of an impending bloodbath, no matter who emerges winner come February. It is quite an unpleasant sight to watch the continuous unravelling of the already worn-out stitches that hold this nation together, the steady tearing of one thread after another, all for the sake of two men whose known portfolios show clearly that both are neither qualified to run nor fit to lead a nation as complex as ours.

On 31st of December, 1983, Buhari and his fellow coupists overthrew a democratically elected government. With a bold and militant speech, filled with contempt for democratic and civilian rule, he ended the second republic and ushered Nigeria once more into the dark days of military rule which was to last for 15 years. This act was initially met with joy and celebration among the citizenry. Little did he know back then that the same citizens would rejoice 20 months later on his overthrew, or that 31 years on he would be contesting as a civilian in a democratic setting for a record four times in a row.

Image of Gen. Muhammadu Buhari as Head of State, & Commander in Chief of the Armed Forces of Nigeria

Image of Gen. Muhammadu Buhari as Head of State, & Commander in Chief of the Armed Forces of Nigeria

Time is a funny thing, and Nigerians with their chronic amnesia are even more funny. Our infinite capacity to forgive and forget is incredulous, and borders on cheer insanity. A man who advocated brutality and torture as a means of getting things done. Who scorn on the rule of law, who had people incarcerated without trials, and kept them in prison even after their acquittal under the most inhumane of condition is today the messiah we need. A man who had no problem serving under Abacha; that corrupt mantra, who was reported as saying that Abacha had no case to answer in terms of corruption, and who currently is working with Tinubu, Amaechi and other ex-PDP thieves and co, men who had and are looting their state and constituency dry, that same man is now an anti-corruption general. What hurts me the most is when I see youths of today; many of whom are 21 years and below saying that Buhari; a 72 year old man, who was governor at the age of 30, minister at 30-something, Head of State at 41 is the future for Nigeria. The irony of this statement is neither palatable for me, nor is it beginning to make sense beyond it being a figure of speech.

Looking that Goodluck Jonathan; our president for the past 5 years (going to six), who appealed to us back in 2011 with his speech of fresh air and change. A lot of us believed him even though we had our suspicion of PDP. The Truth is that we were already tired of the old guard who have been there since Flora Shaw seduced Lord Lugard into naming this entity; Nigeria. Thus we threw our lots with him believing that at least, President Goodluck would break the old hegemony and give us something different. 5 years and counting, with fuel selling at a higher price ever, a growing and embolden cabal, zero conviction of corrupt public officials, pardon for convicted public officials, high insecurity in the land, rise in terrorism, disarray of the army, decrease of Nigerian status in international circles, civil disobedience, unpatriotic and treasonous statements from political proponents and opponents, growing inflation and unemployment, high level of youth restiveness etc, a lot of us are beginning to repent from our previous decision.

President Goodluck Jonathan

President Goodluck Jonathan

President Goodluck Jonathan in his 5 years as Head of State, and Commander in Chief of the armed forces have failed majority of Nigerians, especially the lower class and the lower-middle class. He has not shown leadership quality, and a-times had appeared unwilling to seize the initiative or to make the hard decisions needed to secure Nigerians and Nigerian interests. His decision to remove petroleum subsidy instead of persecuting the beneficiaries of subsidy scam exposed his lack of willpower to make the hard choice, rather he chose the path of least resistance, which is to dump the burden on we; the ordinary people of Nigeria. His lack of imagination and innovation, strong-will and strictness in handling the Boko-Haram mayhem betrayed his lack of judgment and understanding of what the role of government is; which is first and foremost the security of lives and properties of Nigerians. This actions and more have led to the loss of faith in his administration, by many previous supporters, save a few who are currently benefiting from his rule, and others who are driven by tribal and religious sentiments.

Hence with election 41 days away, and with the presidency (if there will still be a Nigeria after the election) going to one of the two, the future for Nigeria is dire. The foot soldiers of the two are getting their arsenal ready to cause mayhem in the eventuality that their candidate loses. I don’t want to be a prophet of doom (God know there are so many of them already) but if care is not taken, and with the way things are developing we might be having two or more nations, or a civil war by the end of the year.

To be fair the both candidate; I must concede that there are some factors that mitigated against the two of them. Buhari ruled for only 20 months, in which time he oversaw the persecution of large number of people for corrupt practises albeit mostly southerners and members of the opposition party. He tried to instill a rule of discipline among Nigerians who before then (and after then) had carried on their unruly and rowdy behaviour of jumping queue, dumping of refuse indiscriminately, urinating in public places etc. He also tried to put a rigid and disciplined hold in the handling of the economy, which was a failure though, but who knows what might have been if he was allowed back then to continue to say; 48 months.

President Goodluck Jonathan, on the other hand have ruled beyond the 48 months period, and I am not blind to some of the developmental strides he has tried to introduce in a decayed system such as ours. Such as the revival of our rail system, the rehabilitation of our roads, the containment of Ebola, the building of schools especially in the core-northern areas, the increase of minimum wage, the privatisation of power, conducting of credible elections among other things. Being from a minority tribe and having little political weight in Nigeria, plus having an very powerful and ever-power-hungry cabal of Northern origin who are not only opposed to his presidency, but have continued to agitate what they see as the lose of their turn to rule. I must confess that the challenges before him is enormous and calls for some pragmatic steps, and one might be tempted to sympathise with him.

But the truth is that after 54 years of taking scraps and shit from our ruling class, Nigerians can no longer afford to vote based on “What If” or “Sympathy” or tribal and religious affiliation. We saw hell during those 20 months of Buhari’s draconic regime, and Nigerians are seeing hell during this over-gentle and over-indulging regime of Jonathan. Who would have taught that two very opposite regime; Buhari and Jonathan, military and civilian, draconic and civil, brutal and gentle would have such similar effect on a Nation. A lot of us will not like to admit it, but Buhari and Jonathan are birds of a feather, and no matter the weather, will always flock together, and if past experiences are anything to go by, both will take us nowhere greener. I do not envy Nigerian voters at all. Having being asked to choose between the duo; Buhari and Jonathan, Nigerian voters are now left with no choice except the Devil and the deep blue sea.

The statements, views and opinions stated in this write up is solely those of the author, and does not necessarily represent those of Lyriversity.

Lyriversity — Liberty of Creativity

Map of Nigeria, courtesy unknown

Map of Nigeria, courtesy unknown

by Okoye Chukwudi Charles Ezeamalukwuo

Are you currently sitting in a hold up? Are you looking for a job, or being laid off? Are you presently being harmed or harassed by the security personnels stationed to protect you? Or are you tearing apart a stewed leg of an innocent chicken? There is this thing in the air, and it’s not Boko-haram (though T.B. Joshua may beg to differ), it’s not the unelectrified bulb, and it’s not witches or the woman-bird. . .it is the 2015 general election.

With Atiku and Buhari declaring their intentions to contest, and PDP agreeing on Goodluck Jonathan, and with Kwankwaso, Rochas, (and maybe Chris Okotie, Pat Utomi et al) soon to declare their intentions as well, I believe that the ground is being watered for the plundering.

But in all of these politicking and lobbying, there are three things I am sure of; come 2015, with all things being equal.

1) There will be no change in the socio-political structure or economic imbalance in the nation regardless of which party wins the 2015 Presidential election.
2) APC and PDP are the same. A vote for APC is similar to a vote for PDP and vice versa.
3) President Goodluck Jonathan does not deserve to be Nigeria’s president beyond 2015.

Some folks will call me a prophet of doom; one who is pessimistic about the fate of the Nation. Others will call me a skeptic, a blind un-believer who can not see the achievements and promises of positive change that the opposition has got. There are still many who will want to chastise me for not understanding that the current administration has tried so much in the face of all the opposition and sabotage the president has had to endure and still endure, and that the opposition is our major problem.

But I am not a prophet of doom or pessimistic. I am neither a skeptic nor an un-believer. In fact, I believe that the opposition has a major role to play in any democratic setting. I believe that the challenges before the present administration are enormous, and that the opposition has not been helpful at all in providing reasonable solution to any of them.

APC as an the opposition in Nigeria under the scrutiny of a microscope is mainly an aggromeration of disgruntled individuals, many of whom have failed in their respective mandates and manifestos. APC to me is a party without ideology (as is with PDP), with no manifesto, no code of conduct, no vision except to gain the presidency. And for APC to admit aggrieved PDP members, many of whom are beneficiaries of the same corrupt system that they claim to be fighting, has shown most of us sitting on the fence that the party is no messiah at all, and that we have to wait awhile for the messiah to come.
APC die-hard followers have always argued that there is strength in number. And that sometimes a good man has to seek alliance with evil men in order to win. This I totally disagree with. Darkness and Light have no connection at all at all. Show me your friends and I will show you who you are. And having seen APC members, I can comfortably say that APC is PDP in everything but presidency. A quick look at there Presidential candidates so far shows the same crop of ancient politicians who might have been there when Flora Shaw seduced Lord Lugard into naming this country; Nigeria. Kwankwaso is a bit young, but he is a PDP product who has no structure outside the core north. Atiku is seen by almost all as the controller general of corruption. Buhari; the anti-corruption general has history against him. His regime and Abacha’s are both competing for the all time most brutal and draconic regime. He is old, and seen by folks in many places in the south and middle belt as not being a Nigerian candidate, but a core Northern candidate.

Coming to PDP, the ruling party that has been there for 15 years now. Whose first president is now half PDP, half APC, and who gave us two violent selections in the name of 2003 and 2007 elections. PDP to me is the main problem of Nigeria. It is a cancer that was given birth to during the “10-percenter” days of the first republic, survived the civil war, and the lacklustre regime of the second republic, nurtured by the Babangida’s and Abacha’s administrations, legalised under Abdulsalami’s regime and Blosoomed in 1999 as a full blown epidemic. Yes PDP as well as Goodluck Jonathan’s administration does not deserve to exist beyond 2015.
A lot of folks say that President Jonathan is a good fellow and has good plans for the Nation. Some say that he is trying his best. But the truth remains that whether it is Boko-Haram, Kidnapping, Oil Bunkering, Corruption, Youth Unemployment, Low Power Supply, Insecurity, Lawlessness, Infrastructural Under-development. . .name it; President Jonathan is not a casualty of any of these, or is his immediate friends and family among the victims of any of the myriads of Nigerian problems. The same can be said for the opposition leaders. It is the common Nigerians that have to suffer these, so the idea that Mr President is the target of some local and foreign detractors are nothing but bullocks.
Has Mr President done enough to curb any of these problems? The answer (even in Thunder) is a resounding NO. Corruption and Impunity have grown exponentially under his administration. And coupled with his unwillingness to take a decisive step in tackling any of these problems, is not helping his case among those of us sitting on the fence.

So APC and PDP are out of the question in terms of producing a messiah. Then what is the way forward? Is there light at this really long dark tunnel? With the way things are shaping out, there doesn’t seem to be. It is unfortunate that Nigeria is a non-homogenous, and complex country that have a simple way of partitioning us all into opposing groups. . .we swear, we curse at each other, and at the end of the day we support the same group of men who kept us in this harsh condition. Many people who support President Goodluck Jonathan, do so simply for sentimental reasons…and they are mainly South-southerners and South easterners with a mixture of Middle Belterns and South westerners. You can hardly see a core Northerner supporting Goodluck Jonathan, they are Buhari’s core supporters. Yes Buhari’s base are mainly in the core North, a mixture of South-westerners, Middle Belterns. You can hardly see a South-southerners or South-easterners supporting Buhari. Same can be said of Atiku and Kwankwaso, who have there supporters restricted to their region. We are all Tribalist, and this makes 2015 very interesting but with little prospect for change.

The only way I see towards having a change in Nigeria is to for the good men (who are in large numbers) to go and form their own party. A party with clear ideology and strict code of conduct which will regulate its members. A kind of association built from the ground up. Which should involve every strata of the Nigerian socio-economic society. . .which should include traders, teachers, scholars, students, church leaders, muslim leaders, farmers, carpenters, technicians, bankers, lecturers, etc. Everyone is called to partake and contribute their quota. . . and not a party of the elite for the elite.

The problem with Nigeria (and indeed Africa countries) is the failure of Leadership. Achebe said this, and I’m reaffirming it. Our government is not ours. It is a foreign entity legitimatised by a sham election and a broken system that is recognised by the West. If we pulled down the government and the system that sustains it, and replace it with a government that truly draws its power from the masses, then the domino effect will be drastic and progressive.

How do we change our system? Simple, start changing from the bottom, because the up will only take divine intervention to change. Good men need to start organising themselves, and start taking back their community little by little. Find people of similar ideology, form an association, a cult. . .contribute money, share ideas, and then go out to the streets and make it better.
You are paying N50K a term on school fees, that’s N150K per year. Try and get one or more parents to your side, join your money together, send your child to a public school, and use the money to develop that school. Stop complaining, APC and PDP won’t improve education in Nigeria, their children are not here. Stop waiting on those men, they and their children are not Nigerians anymore. And until we realise that APC and PDP are not here for Nigerians, until we do, and start working towards regaining our nation, until then. . .the light at the end of the tunnel may remain ever elusive.

The statements, views, and opinions in this write up is solely those of the writer, and does not necessarily represent those of Lyriversity.

Lyriversity — Liberty of Creativity

Leader of Boko-Haram; Abubakar Shekau (centre) with members of the terrorist group

Leader of Boko-Haram; Abubakar Shekau (centre) with members of the terrorist group

by Okoye Chukwudi Charles Ezeamalukwuo

There are very few things that move me these day, very few news, happenings and developments in this political entity called Nigeria that would get me to blink talk less of moving my hands to react. The Nigeria Society has had so many bad news of late…The rise of boko-haram, the Chibok kidnapping, the bombings and conspiracies, the CBN governorship saga, the PDP-APC tug of war, Oil thefts, Stampede of unemployed youths, the death of Dora Akunyili in far away India etc…all these are happenings that I as a Nigerian have gotten used to…I have so acclimatised myself to them that I no longer flinch when the breaking news of horror are being announced on the media…Yes I am sitting in house ignoring the cries of the she-goat delivering her kid in tethers.

Last night I read an opinion piece by one Daniel Greenfield on the facebook wall of a one-time Minister of Aviation of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, Mr Femi Fani-Kayode.

To read the article by Daniel Greenfield click Obama’s Alliance with Boko-Haram

In that article, the writer blamed President Obama and the USA administration’s pussyfooting in labelling Boko-haram as a terrorist orgainisation for the increase in terrorism in Nigeria. He also went further in absolving Nigerian Government (Past but especially Present) from any blame as regards the rise of insurgency in our country, while criticising the western nations/media (whom he called leftist ideologists) for scolding Nigerian security operatives for their glaring brutality and high-handedness in handling the Boko-haram issue (and anyother issue for that matter). The writer concluded that the Obama’s administration is trying to bring down the Nigerian Government which is headed by a Christian Southerner, and stated also that the same Obama’s administration is in bed with the Muslim world including the Muslim Brotherhood, PLO and Talibans of Afghanistan.

Mr Femi Fani-Kayode

Mr Femi Fani-Kayode

Normally I would have read this, sighed and moved on…but the personality of Femi Kayode on whose wall this post is (still) on, and the growing number of young Nigerians who are reading and commenting favourably to it made indifference a very wrong step for me to take this time.

First of all I must say that I am no fan of the western governments (USA and co) and their media who to me are one of the major obstacles to world peace. And I am inclined also to agree with some of the points raised in the writeup like Boko-Haram waging a religious war against Christians in Nigeria…But besides these, I totally disagree with and condemn the writeup.

Many times have I heard and seen people criticising USA for not quickly calling Boko-haram for what they are; A Terrorist Organisation, but this has always left me amazed when I hear it coming from Nigerians, prominent Nigerians at that. Is Nigeria not a soveriegn Nation? Since when did we become the 51st state of America? How does Obama’s stance on Boko-Haram affect the security of lives and properties in Nigeria? Are we no longer the giant of Africa? Have we become so helpless that we now need others to help us patrol our borders, to secure our citizens, to defeat an internal and small sized enemy? All these questions come to my mind when I hear folks saying things like the USA should have acted sooner…it beats my imagination to see how far below we have gone.

Moreover, the major culprit of this Crisis is no-other than the Federal Government of Nigeria, and absolving it of that blame turns logic on its head. A lot would argue that the problem did not start with this regime, infact many would say that the problem fattened with the Opposition, and this I do agree to a point…but still the FGN is the last bus-stop, the alpha and the omega. And if the past and especially the present government have been as proactive as it is suppose to be, if the present administration has been sincere in its fight against corruption, in tackling the root causes of this crisis which are poverty and illiteracy, perhaps it might have fared better than this. But No, the present government (together with the opposition) has carried on in the same callous, carefree and corrupt ways that have been synonymous with governance in Nigeria.
Unfortuntely for the FGN, it appears to be both the prey and the predator in this case. Its unwillingness to go after the suspected sponors of Boko-haram whom Mr President told us are in high places (part of his government as he once said) have left the government in a very vulnerable position and its efforts against Boko-haram have become more like dogs that only bark but rarely bite.
Also unfortunately for us, ordinary citizens of Nigeria, we are the ones who pay with our lives and livelihood, our blood, our sweats, our properties for the ineptitude of this present administration. It is our brothers, sisters, mothers, fathers, sons, daughters, friends, neighbours etc that are slaughtered whenever Boko-Haram strikes. It is neither Daniel Greenfield nor Femi Fani-Kayode, nor any member of their immediate friends and family, nor anyone of those men in power or in the corridor of power that will bear the blunt for the blunders of this government.

A Victim of Boko-Haram's bombing in Nyanya Abuja

A Victim of Boko-Haram’s bombing in Nyanya Abuja

President Goodluck in Kano rally, less than 24 hours after Nyanya bomb blast

President Goodluck in Kano rally, less than 24 hours after Nyanya bomb blast

women crying for relatives lost in Boko-haram Bombing

women crying for relatives lost in Boko-haram Bombing

Furthermore, something seriously has to be done as regards the orientation of the Nigerian Security Forces. It is an open secret that the Nigerian Police and Army (and any other gun wielding organisation in the country) have got an A first and foremost in Indimidation, violations of human rights, accidental discharge of live ammunitions and callousness in the securing of lives and properties. Reading Femi Kayode state something contrary to this does not surprise me. In fact nothing our elites do these days surprises me…they are all far from the realities on ground. It is not a lie that the brutality and savagery that the Nigerian security forces exhibited against suspected members of Boko-Haram (Real and imagined) have won great sympathy for the Boko-Haram cause among certain sections of the populace, and have also made very easy the recruitment into Boko-Haram. Those who state otherwise show a complete ignorance of the Nigerian security operations…the cases of Asaba Massacre of 1967, Odi Massacre of 1999, Operation sweep in OBJ first tenure, and the initial crushing of Boko-Haram members in 2009, all go to show the modus operandi of the Nigerian Security Forces…which is Brutality; shoot first, ask questions later, this and nothing more…but unfortunately for them (and also for us), they have encountered a more brutal and resilient opponent in Boko-Haram. Who like themselves are equal in zeal, and ready for the slaughter.

A suspect pledding while being stripped naked by a Policeman

A suspect pledding while being stripped naked by a Policeman

A Citizen Forced to Frog Jump by a Policeman

A Citizen Forced to Frog Jump by a Policeman

Victim of Police Brutality

Victim of Police Brutality

The solution for us right now is far from the ones raised by Daniel Greenfield or the ones championed by Oduduwa’s town-crier Femi Kayode. No, the solution for us is to find a way to hold our government, this government together with the opposition accountable to us.
Honestly, I don’t see as things are today the government of PDP, APC, APGA et al giving us the dividends of Democracy. What we really need is a change in the crop of leaders both in government and opposition. But while we work towards this development, we will still continue to hope that the government of Goodluck Jonathan finds a way to be sincere in its fight against corruption, in its fight against terror, in providing good governance.
The security forces need new and better ideology. In their efforts on insecurity, they need to partner with and not prejudice the local community. They should understand that being a civilian does not make one sub-human, that a suspect is innocent until proven guilty. They should find better ways to infiltrate the terrorist cells; brains and not just bullets, bloods and battles.
The Nigerian economic and education situations should be revisited. Crime is on the increase, and slowly it will get more sofisticated if left unchecked. The real root of crime, of insecurity, of Boko-Haram has always been poverty; poverty of mind and body. And if this government does not find a way to address this growing poverty it will soon have more than just Boko-Haram to contend with…call me a leftist or a prophet of doom.

The statements, views and opinions stated in this column is solely those of the writer, and do not necessarily represent those of Lyriversity

Lyriversity — Liberty of Creativity