YEARS AFTER YEARS

Posted: July 18, 2014 in Poetry
Tags: ,

by Chime Ndubuisi Justice Cjn

Year after year, your eyes
Eyes of the night remained socketed
To the wall of your heavy head.
They remained the first place you met them
They do not change, obedient wrecks!
The words they spoke are drunk,
Drunk like the muzzles of a short gun,
Gun which translates the idea in your brain,
Brain attached to rolling stones,
Stones carved out of dead mountains,
Mountains of the world, the first mountain,
Mountain where Noah’s ark rested then,
Then it was seen no more. We’re believers,
Believers, demoralised, and demented,
Demented by creeds and rituals and sacrifices,
Sacrifices, such that caused the first death,
Death on the stake, year in year out
Out there, multitude of sins are forgiven,
Forgiven sins are repeated! Doomed souls,
Souls of the world. How lucky we are!
Are we not? Docile rumours
Rumours of their death, no, ours;
Ours are soft deaths, aged death
Death of the last Adam,
Adam the prostitute, Adam the betrayer
Betrayer of the world under his care.
Care should be taken here,
Here is where out poem began.

Lyriversity — Liberty of Creativity

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Comments
  1. Ezeamalukwuo says:

    He smiles…I see A Satire, attacking organised religion (christianity)..its doctrines and beliefs, stories and faith. I see a call for man to embrace reason, to wake up and stop being like zombie…to use our brain, move our eyes which have remained immobile by the passage of time…years after years. This is Lyriversity Material, I like it.

  2. LegendaryCJN says:

    You opened my eyes to a new understanding of this poem. I never thought of the poem from this perspective.
    Thanks Ogaoga

    • Ezeamalukwuo says:

      Now I’m inclined to ask you for a clue (not an explanation) of this poem from your own perspective…please, a clue and not an explanation.

      • LegendaryCJN says:

        I’m sorry my good man, I don’t have.
        According to Plato, poets are liars. Liars in the sense that the write what they know nothing about. He sees poets (every artist) as an inbetween person, i.e, a person inbetween the gods at Olympus and human. The gods send their messages to the poet, who sometime do not understand its content fully, but must deliver it to the humans anyway. So Plato sees poets as blind mouthpieces.

        • timnwaobilo says:

          That quote was from Plato dialoguing with Ion of Ephesus.
          Poets are the most DIVINE of humans I suppose.

          • LegendaryCJN says:

            Yes Boss #Tim, it is.
            That’s one point at which I agreed somehow totally with Plato; I prefer Aristotle’s stance on issues partaining to the literary.
            Plato has a generalizing attitude towards things that I find annoying.

      • LegendaryCJN says:

        I’m sorry my good man, I don’t have.
        According to Plato, poets are liars. Liars in the sense that they write what they know nothing about. He sees poets (every artist) as an inbetween person, i.e, a person inbetween the gods at Olympus and human. The gods send their messages to the poet, who sometime do not understand its content fully, but must deliver it to the humans anyway. So Plato sees poets as blind mouthpieces.
        In other words, I know nothing of what I put down and I don’t think I have a clue.

  3. timnwaobilo says:

    Cjn this is cryptic.
    I read as many meanings as lines.
    Vicious circles eating up the circular snake called man
    Where is his salvation?

    Cjn, am highly impressed, sir.

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